Category: AAC

AAC Story Time

First, I hope everyone is staying safe and healthy!  With schools closed, I’ve seen a lot of posts about AAC use at home, tele-therapy, resources for AAC users, etc.  I’m going to be doing some AAC tele-therapy and I am so excited to see my students and clients!  I am also going to be posting story time videos with AAC.  I’ll be reading books and modeling with an AAC device while reading.  My first book is one of my favorites, “If You Give a Mouse a Cookie!” I know some of my clients like to watch YouTube videos of books and video games and hope some of them will follow along for some aided language stimulation.  You can watch the video here.

I”ll mostly be modeling on LAMP WFL, Unity, and WordPower 60 since that’s what most of my clients use.  But, feel free to send me an email and I am happy to model with a different system!

Many of my students have vision impairments and benefit from hands on literacy experiences.  Although, honestly anyone can benefit from a hands on experience when learning language ūüôā So for my first story, I also made a second video for parents about story boxes.  You can watch the video here. Story boxes are interactive literacy experiences using objects or items that correlate to the story.  You can learn more about story boxes from this article on the Paths to Literacy website.

I hope this is a helpful resource for everyone at home!

Using the Tell Me Program in Your Classroom

A few years ago, I heard Carole Zangari present on the Tell Me Program at a PALSS conference.¬† I was watching live with a teacher and another SLP and we immediately wanted to get started!¬† It took a couple of years until the program was available for purchase through Attainment Company, but it was worth the wait!¬† ¬† This year, I’ve worked with several classrooms using this program and have been so impressed with the increase in students’ language and AAC use.¬† Hang in there, this post is a bit on the longer side but has some great resources!

The program comprises of a ten day (two week) learning sequence revolving around one book.  The books tend to be simple and familiar.  Many have predictable pictures or text.  Each two week sequence has:

  1. Target vocabulary words and a target letter. – We decided to do two target letters per book for contrast.¬† (Check out this post by Jane Farrall where she talks about providing at least two and up to six “letters of the week” for alphabet learning.)¬†
  2. Shared Writing lessons
  3. Shared Reading lessons 
  4. Quack Quack Questions – Simple questions that can be answered using target or concept vocabulary.
  5. Dramatic play.  РThis has been a favorite component of ours and has encouraged carryover of target vocabulary into other contexts. 

There are many other components to the program, but these are the ones that we have been most successful in implementing!

I saw a post on Facebook about how the amazing mom from the “Hold My Words” page, created a chart book to go along with the program.¬† You can check out her video post¬†here.¬† She used a few pieces of poster board to create her chart book and it seems ideal for home schooling or individual sessions.¬† However, using the program at school, we needed to create something that could be easily replicated for several classrooms.¬† With that in mind, we created a visuals book that has the target words on the front and pages inside for the song, who poster, what poster, story map poster, letters of the week, and quack quack questions.¬† For each of the eleven books in the program, we created a unique visuals book that we printed on tabloid paper, laminated, and bound.¬† After the eleventh book, another teacher and I came up with a generic template for the book and visuals.¬† You can download our template for the book and icons!¬† You can also see the book and icons we made for the “I Went Walking” book.¬† If people are interested, I’m happy to share the visuals from the other ten books!¬† You can email me at amandasoperslp@gmail.com for access to the rest.

We also put together a dramatic play kit for every unit.  We make sure to include accommodations for our switch users!  This is a great time to work on language carry-over using the words of the week!

Let us know how you use the Tell Me Program in your classroom!

Adapted Book Kit – Bill the Duck and the Ladybug (CVI)

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I recently saw an awesome post on the Paths to Literacy Website from Deena Recker about books for students in different CVI phases. Check it out here. ¬†It’s a great post as she outlines different characteristics for Phases I, II, and III. ¬†She also provides free downloadable books to be used for students with CVI. ¬†I downloaded this fun one, Bill the Duck and the Ladybug. My SLP intern and I decided to make this into one of our adapted book kits!

We adapted/ included a few things in this kit. ¬†First, my intern put the story on a black background. ¬†Next we found a rubber duck and a light up ladybug (it’s Easter time so CVS is packed with tons of little spring light up toys like this). ¬†My intern has been reading this with one of our students who has characteristics of CVI Phase I. ¬†He’s been very clearly looking at the pictures in the book and saying “turn” to ask her to turn the page with his talker! ¬†She also reenacts the story using the story props.

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Next we made a simple counting book to go along with the story. ¬†We followed the same guidelines and kept the text on one page and the picture on the other. ¬†We kept the background black, used bright text, and added some glitter to our spots to make them more visually attractive. ¬†On the last page of the book, we made a ladybug with removable spots. ¬†The Velcro on the ladybug is painted red so that it blends in. ¬†We did this so that it would not get confusing when counting “spots” on the ladybug if there were less than 5 black spots on. ¬†Then we made black spots with some glitter on them (again to make them more visually attractive).

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We provided teachers with a few ways to work on numbers and counting while using this interactive activity. ¬†We included ideas for labeling numbers on a student’s talker, following directions with numbers, and counting.

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You can find the PowerPoint with the instructions for our adapted book kit here.  Enjoy!

How To Adapt Graphic Novels in PowerPoint

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Earlier this year, I found out that my beloved Baby-Sitters Club books had been turned into graphic novels. I immediately thought of a few pre-teen girls I know that would love to read these books on their eye-gaze devices. In our previous post, we discuss using Office 365 on Accent Devices to display adapted PowerPoint books. This would also be possible using the PowerPoint App on the iPad.

Unfortunately, I didn’t quite realize how daunting it would be to adapt the entire chapter book. I promise that it will be available for anyone who can demonstrate proof of purchase for the book when I it is complete. Until that time, I thought I would provide some instructions¬†for how to I adapt graphic novels (I have listed a few suggestions, provided by a very helpful Barnes & Noble employee, below).

Roller Girl                              El Deafo                                        Amulet

                      

Continue reading for step-by-step instructions for adapting graphic novels in PowerPoint.

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Eye Gaze PowerPoint Book Template

PowerPoint can make adapting books a breeze. We recently took the same features we use when making books for the computer or iPad and created a book for an Accent 1400 with NuEye. The Accent 1400 allows the user to download Microsoft with PowerPoint 360. This opens up the endless activity possibilities available through PowerPoint.

AlphaOops! H is for Halloween is the first book we tried this with and it was a hit!  Each slide contains 4 icons that the child can click to turn the page, hear audio of the page, go back, or exit the book.

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Continue reading for a free template and step-by-step directions.

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Writing Activities Using Instant Messaging Apps For Kids

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An important rule in implementing comprehensive literacy instruction is that children need to be presented with multiple opportunities to write for multiple purposes (click here to read a great post from Caroline on the 3 T’s of Writing). When I reflect on my own day, I can include communication through text message and social media as two of my main forms of written expression. I made a Facebook Status Writing Activity a few months ago, and wanted to explore text messaging apps for kids next. I downloaded Roo Kids and PlayKids Talk, but will only be sharing information about Roo Kids, due to the security features of PlayKids Talk preventing Amanda and I from trying¬†it (PlayKids Talk uses a photo of the user’s parent to determine if they are old enough to use the app and apparently Amanda does not pass for over 21).

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AAChronicles #13

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On Wednesday, one of the fabulous teachers we work with asked her student, “Let’s write about Father’s Day today. What do you want to write about your grandpa/uncle?” The student immediately responded “funny to play, little, love” on his Accent.

Hope this put a smile on your face at the end of a long week!

#SeeMeSeeMyAAC Twitter Bulletin Board

I love seeing pictures people have posted with the #SeeMeSeeMyAAC. Unfortunately, due to privacy protections for our students we have been unable to participate. The other day I was thinking that a lot of the adults and students in our school could benefit from seeing photos of students doing typical activities with their captured voices in the photo as well. Amanda and I created a bulletin board explaining the #. Click here and here to download the documents.

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We then sent a template out to teachers and therapists asking them to post pictures of their students with a short blurb about what they were doing when the picture was taken.

Twitter Board 1 Within the hour, one teacher added several pictures of her students giving presentations in class.

My favorite addition is a photo of a teacher and student having lunch after the student said “Should we lunch [Teacher’s name]?”.

Let us know if you decide to start a #SeeMeSeeMyAAC campaign at your school!

AAChronicles #12

AAChronicles

On Wednesday, Amanda and I received an email from a wonderful SLP we work with, sharing a few great AAC stories from her day. Hopefully they put a smile on your face as well.

“Student A was trying to get his behavior specialist to go away. I’ve insisted that … he use his device or screen shot of the device and they have been great about that. He told him to “leave” about 8 times but he couldn’t leave the room due to safety concerns so Student A stopped, looked ¬†at his device, and¬†tried “away” 5 times . I guess we found a motivating request!!!???”

“Student B used two word combo independently again with “[SLPs name] help” while completing her morning journal. While in the kitchen she was¬†not heard over the noise of the students. I had shown her how to “yell” when need be and she did to get [OTs name] attention.”

“[OTs name] and I had THE BEST co treat today I’ve ever had. We took Student C to the sensory room and tried swings, balls, snacks, videos, everything and he not only had a calmer body afterwards but was attending to the device during modeling from [OTs name] and I, as well as tracking if we drew his attention to the device and initiating using the device as well. Still working on finger isolation but all of that is huge improvement.”

I particularly love the story about a student yelling. A few of us have discussed teaching students how to raise their voice when no one is listening to them. I see it as a very important skill, especially when adults are not acknowledging what they are saying or brushing it off as unintentional. I think the next step will be learning how to whisper.

 

 

Great Expectations Program // An Excellent Resource For All Students

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I recently discovered the Great Expectations program from the National Braille Press. The program is designed to bring

“… popular picture books to life using a multi-sensory approach ‚ÄĒ songs, tactile play, picture descriptions, body movement, engaged listening ‚ÄĒ all designed to promote active reading experiences for children with visual impairments.”

I have found that although some of the activities as specific to students with visual impairments (activities focused on reading braille and using cane), most of the resources on the website can be used for all children. After all, “songs, tactile play, picture descriptions, body movement, engaged listening” are used by effective teachers and therapists across disciplines.

The website has a list of featured books that they provide resources for.

 

featured books  Each title comes with a list of tips and activities you can use when teaching the text. You can also purchase the book in braille through the site. The resources for each book include descriptions of the pictures. This is great for students with visual impairments, but is also a good resource for teachers who are learning how to use the descriptive teaching model to instruct students using AAC.

Dragons Love Tacos Activties

Thanks to this website, I have fallen in love with the book “Dragons Love Tacos“.

Dragons Love Tacos

If you have a copy of the book, I am happy to share my adapted, high contrast, PowerPoint version and my PowerPoint for the song. Just send me an email or message me through Facebook or Twitter with proof that you own the book.

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I hope you enjoy this resource as much as I do.

-Lauren