ISAAC 2016 Session Handout

We are so happy to share some of our ideas for integrating language and technology for students with multiple disabilities at ISAAC 2016. You can download the handout from our presentation by clicking here. 

Most of the activities that we shared during our session are available through our website. If you are searching for a specific activity and can’t find it please let us know through email and we will point you in the right direction. If you are looking for a book that is not available on our website due to copyright reasons, please email us with proof that you own the original book and we can send you the adapted version.

Thanks!

Lauren and Amanda

ISAAC Take-Aways: Day One

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  1. We are so excited about the resources currently available on the Project Core Website.  The resources for Universal Core Vocabulary Systems will be sure to help many!  And we can’t wait to see how their research progresses while developing a comprehensive implementation program for core vocabulary instruction.project core
  2. Loved Caroline Musselwhite’s and Gretchen Hanser’s presentation on predictable chart writing.  They suggested using a document camera to show the class what students are saying on their AAC systems.

doc camera

3. Vikki Haddix, Mary Shannon Marcella, and Laura Henry shared how they developed a team of people knowledgeable about AAC in their district.  Their 1x/month, 2 hour groups reviewing research studies/ papers and discussing their own tough AAC cases sounds like a great model for professional development.

4. Caroline Musselwhite and Gretchen Hanser made the point that typically developing children get FOUR years to scribble before they begin to form letters and words in their writing.  Why do we have different expectations for individuals with CCN, especially the older students who have never been given a chance to write?   scribble 1 scribble 2

5. Kate Anderson recommended providing parents and educators with “hot” and “cold” knowledge about AAC.  Parents tend to prefer “hot knowledge” such as information given during a social interaction (i.e. conversation, online forum).  So we should provide that in addition to the “cold” knowledge we typically provide in the form of handouts and pamphlets.

hot and cold

Adapted Pop-Up Pirate Boardmaker Game

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We have been slowly chipping away at the stack of games and toys got to adapt through a grant. The most recent game has been Pop-up Pirate. I am still figuring out how I am going to adapt the actual game pieces (maybe some built up handles) but I went ahead and adapted it for a touch screen on Boardmaker. Click on any of the pictures below to download the file from Boardmaker Share.

Pirate Game (more…)

Pete the Cat and His Magic Sunglasses//Video Book

Pete the Cat

I love Pete the Cat books! They are about a fun character, contain positive messages, and come with great songs and videos. I saw the newest book when I was at Barnes & Noble last week and had to get it. Pete the Cat and His Magic Sunglasses is a wonderful story about optimism and a positive outlook. It also fits right into summer activities because of those COOL, BLUE, MAGIC sunglasses.

Yesterday, I downloaded the video that goes with the book on the Pete the Cat website. Using a few hyperlinks and the  video trimming tool, I was able to make a fun video book. You can download it here by clicking either picture below.

Book Cover Book PageAfter a quick Pinterest search, I also found this website with printable templates to make your own glasses. I envision a fun writing activity where students make their own glasses and then choose 3 adjectives (Pete’s are COOL, BLUE, and MAGIC) to describe them. The class can make a book with the sentence “Look at my _____, ______, ______ sunglasses.” with a photo of them wearing their sunglasses.

I would love to hear back from you when you use this activity!

AAChronicles #13

AAChronicles

On Wednesday, one of the fabulous teachers we work with asked her student, “Let’s write about Father’s Day today. What do you want to write about your grandpa/uncle?” The student immediately responded “funny to play, little, love” on his Accent.

Hope this put a smile on your face at the end of a long week!

#SeeMeSeeMyAAC Twitter Bulletin Board

I love seeing pictures people have posted with the #SeeMeSeeMyAAC. Unfortunately, due to privacy protections for our students we have been unable to participate. The other day I was thinking that a lot of the adults and students in our school could benefit from seeing photos of students doing typical activities with their captured voices in the photo as well. Amanda and I created a bulletin board explaining the #. Click here and here to download the documents.

Twitter Board 2

We then sent a template out to teachers and therapists asking them to post pictures of their students with a short blurb about what they were doing when the picture was taken.

Twitter Board 1 Within the hour, one teacher added several pictures of her students giving presentations in class.

My favorite addition is a photo of a teacher and student having lunch after the student said “Should we lunch [Teacher’s name]?”.

Let us know if you decide to start a #SeeMeSeeMyAAC campaign at your school!

AAChronicles #12

AAChronicles

On Wednesday, Amanda and I received an email from a wonderful SLP we work with, sharing a few great AAC stories from her day. Hopefully they put a smile on your face as well.

“Student A was trying to get his behavior specialist to go away. I’ve insisted that … he use his device or screen shot of the device and they have been great about that. He told him to “leave” about 8 times but he couldn’t leave the room due to safety concerns so Student A stopped, looked  at his device, and tried “away” 5 times . I guess we found a motivating request!!!???”

“Student B used two word combo independently again with “[SLPs name] help” while completing her morning journal. While in the kitchen she was not heard over the noise of the students. I had shown her how to “yell” when need be and she did to get [OTs name] attention.”

“[OTs name] and I had THE BEST co treat today I’ve ever had. We took Student C to the sensory room and tried swings, balls, snacks, videos, everything and he not only had a calmer body afterwards but was attending to the device during modeling from [OTs name] and I, as well as tracking if we drew his attention to the device and initiating using the device as well. Still working on finger isolation but all of that is huge improvement.”

I particularly love the story about a student yelling. A few of us have discussed teaching students how to raise their voice when no one is listening to them. I see it as a very important skill, especially when adults are not acknowledging what they are saying or brushing it off as unintentional. I think the next step will be learning how to whisper.

 

 

Great Expectations Program // An Excellent Resource For All Students

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I recently discovered the Great Expectations program from the National Braille Press. The program is designed to bring

“… popular picture books to life using a multi-sensory approach — songs, tactile play, picture descriptions, body movement, engaged listening — all designed to promote active reading experiences for children with visual impairments.”

I have found that although some of the activities as specific to students with visual impairments (activities focused on reading braille and using cane), most of the resources on the website can be used for all children. After all, “songs, tactile play, picture descriptions, body movement, engaged listening” are used by effective teachers and therapists across disciplines.

The website has a list of featured books that they provide resources for.

 

featured books  Each title comes with a list of tips and activities you can use when teaching the text. You can also purchase the book in braille through the site. The resources for each book include descriptions of the pictures. This is great for students with visual impairments, but is also a good resource for teachers who are learning how to use the descriptive teaching model to instruct students using AAC.

Dragons Love Tacos Activties

Thanks to this website, I have fallen in love with the book “Dragons Love Tacos“.

Dragons Love Tacos

If you have a copy of the book, I am happy to share my adapted, high contrast, PowerPoint version and my PowerPoint for the song. Just send me an email or message me through Facebook or Twitter with proof that you own the book.

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I hope you enjoy this resource as much as I do.

-Lauren