Tag: AAC

AAChronicles #13

AAChronicles

On Wednesday, one of the fabulous teachers we work with asked her student, “Let’s write about Father’s Day today. What do you want to write about your grandpa/uncle?” The student immediately responded “funny to play, little, love” on his Accent.

Hope this put a smile on your face at the end of a long week!

#SeeMeSeeMyAAC Twitter Bulletin Board

I love seeing pictures people have posted with the #SeeMeSeeMyAAC. Unfortunately, due to privacy protections for our students we have been unable to participate. The other day I was thinking that a lot of the adults and students in our school could benefit from seeing photos of students doing typical activities with their captured voices in the photo as well. Amanda and I created a bulletin board explaining the #. Click here and here to download the documents.

Twitter Board 2

We then sent a template out to teachers and therapists asking them to post pictures of their students with a short blurb about what they were doing when the picture was taken.

Twitter Board 1 Within the hour, one teacher added several pictures of her students giving presentations in class.

My favorite addition is a photo of a teacher and student having lunch after the student said “Should we lunch [Teacher’s name]?”.

Let us know if you decide to start a #SeeMeSeeMyAAC campaign at your school!

AAChronicles #12

AAChronicles

On Wednesday, Amanda and I received an email from a wonderful SLP we work with, sharing a few great AAC stories from her day. Hopefully they put a smile on your face as well.

“Student A was trying to get his behavior specialist to go away. I’ve insisted that … he use his device or screen shot of the device and they have been great about that. He told him to “leave” about 8 times but he couldn’t leave the room due to safety concerns so Student A stopped, looked  at his device, and tried “away” 5 times . I guess we found a motivating request!!!???”

“Student B used two word combo independently again with “[SLPs name] help” while completing her morning journal. While in the kitchen she was not heard over the noise of the students. I had shown her how to “yell” when need be and she did to get [OTs name] attention.”

“[OTs name] and I had THE BEST co treat today I’ve ever had. We took Student C to the sensory room and tried swings, balls, snacks, videos, everything and he not only had a calmer body afterwards but was attending to the device during modeling from [OTs name] and I, as well as tracking if we drew his attention to the device and initiating using the device as well. Still working on finger isolation but all of that is huge improvement.”

I particularly love the story about a student yelling. A few of us have discussed teaching students how to raise their voice when no one is listening to them. I see it as a very important skill, especially when adults are not acknowledging what they are saying or brushing it off as unintentional. I think the next step will be learning how to whisper.

 

 

Great Expectations Program // An Excellent Resource For All Students

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I recently discovered the Great Expectations program from the National Braille Press. The program is designed to bring

“… popular picture books to life using a multi-sensory approach — songs, tactile play, picture descriptions, body movement, engaged listening — all designed to promote active reading experiences for children with visual impairments.”

I have found that although some of the activities as specific to students with visual impairments (activities focused on reading braille and using cane), most of the resources on the website can be used for all children. After all, “songs, tactile play, picture descriptions, body movement, engaged listening” are used by effective teachers and therapists across disciplines.

The website has a list of featured books that they provide resources for.

 

featured books  Each title comes with a list of tips and activities you can use when teaching the text. You can also purchase the book in braille through the site. The resources for each book include descriptions of the pictures. This is great for students with visual impairments, but is also a good resource for teachers who are learning how to use the descriptive teaching model to instruct students using AAC.

Dragons Love Tacos Activties

Thanks to this website, I have fallen in love with the book “Dragons Love Tacos“.

Dragons Love Tacos

If you have a copy of the book, I am happy to share my adapted, high contrast, PowerPoint version and my PowerPoint for the song. Just send me an email or message me through Facebook or Twitter with proof that you own the book.

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I hope you enjoy this resource as much as I do.

-Lauren

Reading Books on the Accent!

In trying to become fluent in Unity 84 sequenced, I have failed to explore some of the other awesome features on the Accent. I share an office with a great SLP, who just showed me the books that are available on the Accent. There are several books to choose from and they allow the student to read the words on each page using Unity while they look at the book! It’s a great way for students to learn a new motor plan (or continue to practice an old one) and build literacy skills. Here is how you can access the books:

  1. Go to PAGES.

Books on the Accent!

  1. Go to BOOKSCapture 2
  2. Book options will open up. Choose one to read (We chose “What Do You Do?”). They mostly focus on different core words but there are some books that are more complex (e.g., Goldilocks). If you pick the book called “I Can Turn…” (the character changes colors throughout the book), you will see the relevant vocabulary for each page (“I can”, “turn”, colors).Capture 8
  3. Turn the pages by hitting the blue “prev page” and “next page” buttons on the little book page that opens up. The icons that appear are the first ones in the sequences for the vocabulary on the page. The page will move around the screen so that you can access the vocabulary.Books on the Accent!Books on the Accent!Enjoy!

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AAChronicles #11

AAChronicles

When working with a teacher in a classroom with AAC users, I often direct them to Gail Van Tatenhove’s resources on descriptive teaching (you can also find some great youtube videos modeling it). One of the classrooms I have been supporting in has 5, 5 year olds using high-tech. We have been doing shared reading every day after nap-time, and their teacher has been working on commenting on the text and describing what is happening on each page using their devices (with these supports). He is doing a great job using the supports and is beginning to model for the students without using them. The other day, he was having some difficulty coming up with things to model and one of his students said “DESCRIBE” on her Accent. He immediately began describing what was happening on the page. The timing was excellent and we all had a laugh.

Don’t you love it when the students remind you of what you are supposed to be doing!

Have You Heard About CoreScanner?

CSMenuHave you heard about CoreScanner™!  We LOVE it!  It is a vocabulary system designed for switch scanning based on the Words for Life™ vocabulary.  We have several students who had never used two switches to scan before trying the Accent 1000 or Accent 1400 with CoreScanner™.  After an initial model with the system, 5 out of 6 students we tried it with were scanning to speak within the first 30 minute session using the Cornerstones vocabulary.

Check out the CoreScanner™ video that PRC created to demonstrate the system.

My favorite part about CoreScanner™ is that it allows users to gradually increase vocabulary while maintaining consistent motor plans.  At the Cornerstones level, users select words from a field of 8 using linear scanning.  At the Pathway level, users use block scanning to select words from 9 word blocks with a total of 84 locations.  At the JAM and Blast levels, users have access to word families and the ability to add custom vocabulary.

CScornerstones corescanner

So far, all of my students have used two switches at either the head or with their hands to access CoreScanner™.  You should definitely check it out and consider for students who need switches to access AAC systems!

Communication Bill of Rights

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Last year Lauren and I came back from Closing the Gap pretty fired up and ready to make some big changes at our school!  When I first started there in April 2014, I immediately gave some trainings about core language and its important role in AAC. Our biggest challenge was trying to get people to stop re-recording BIGmacks and 8 Cell devices!  But… it’s hard to make changes!  And getting people on board with core (and AAC in general) was happening at a pretty slow rate!  Shortly after we came back, Lauren found Kate Ahern’s picture version of the Communication Bill of Rights.  We immediately posted it and started referring to it in trainings!  We’re still making changes, slowly, but they’re happening!  You can check out the original document from ASHA here!

It’s hard to pick a favorite since they are all important!  But here are the few that I love to remind people about!

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Getting On Board With CORE for Learners with CCN

“Core vocabulary is not going to work for this student” is something I hear all the time.  At this point, I’ve mostly learned to tune it out and continue pushing for my students to have an AAC system with a robust vocabulary which includes CORE language.  But every now and then, my anger over this statement reaches a certain point and I just have to let loose! So here it goes to all the behavior specialists, teachers, administrators, and therapists out there who continue to use this statement.  I’ll let one of my students prove you wrong!

What is CORE vocabulary?

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Core vocabulary is a small set of high frequency words that are used across settings and age groups and are applicable to all topics.  It includes about 350-400 words that make up approximately 80% of what we say.  Core words include a variety of parts of speech including verbs, pronouns, adjectives, prepositions, etc.  In a 2003 study, Banajee, DiCarlo, and Stricklin, found that 26 core words comprised of 96.3% of the total words used by toddlers in the study!  You can check out the list here!  Please share this with all the people who say this (or some variation): “well developmentally, he’s only about two and not ready for a system with those words.”

My other favorite variation is: “Core words just don’t apply to learners with complex communication needs.”  Say this to my students.  I dare you.

This morning a teacher and SLP shared that one of their students has been “hilarious” and “really showing what a personality he has” since getting his Accent 1000 with Unity 84 Sequenced.  Apparently he’s been telling teachers that he doesn’t like: “you bad” or “you awful.”  When denied juice on two separate occasions, he told his teacher “abuse” and “fight.”  He has complex communication needs.  He is using CORE words!  Curious to find out what else he’s saying, I asked his SLP to pull his language data.  Here’s what we saw:

Parts of Speech

Guess what?  Noun vocabulary accounted for only 13.17% of his speech. The nouns + other, which included names of his family, teachers, and friends, accounted for a total of 31.85% of his speech. Pre-stored phrases accounted for 1.15% of his speech.  That means 67% of his speech was comprised of CORE words!

He’s had his device for less than a year.  His language may not exactly follow the 80:20 / core:fringe rule, but he’s pretty darn close!  And without CORE he could never tell his teachers and therapists how “bad” and “awful” their activities are! 🙂

So the next time someone tells you a student can’t use core language because of their complex communication needs, think of my student, and continue advocating for yours!

The Communication Matrix

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At my first IEP meeting as an AT Specialist, a colleague asked me if I was going to be monitoring the student’s progress with her new Tobii Eye Gaze device with the Communication Matrix.  I had never heard of it, but she insisted, so I agreed and quickly looked it up after the meeting!  It has since become one of my favorite assessment tools for students with complex communication needs.

The Communication Matrix looks at communication from pre-intentional behaviors (i.e. crying because you are in pain) to language (i.e. phrases to sentences). For my students with limited or no verbal speech, it can sometimes be challenging to determine what and how they are communicating.  This tool is fantastic because it helps our team pinpoint exactly which behaviors a child uses to communicate for different communicative functions.  Let’s look at this sample student.

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The graph shows us how the student consistently communicates (blue for “mastered”) and how the student is beginning to communicate (yellow for “emerging”).  In addition, we can look at specific skills list to more clearly see how the student communicates for different language functions.

Screen Shot 2015-10-11 at 3.33.30 PMTo protest, the student uses unconventional communication such as body movements, facial expressions, early sounds, and simple gestures and is emerging in his ability to use more conventional communication such as giving items back to you or shaking his head “no.”

Screen Shot 2015-10-11 at 3.37.27 PM   To request attention, the student uses unconventional communication such as early sounds, facial expressions, visual cues, and simple gestures; however, he’s not yet using more conventional means to communicate for this language function.

How do I use the data from the assessment?

It’s a great tool for monitoring student progress when implementing a new AAC system.  We update the matrix yearly and can see gains in communication that the student has made.  Bonus – parents really enjoy seeing a colorful graph that clearly demonstrates the progress their child has made in communication.  It’s also nice for determining areas to work on.  It often helps us realize that our students need to work on MORE than requesting!

You can get started using the Communication Matrix as an assessment tool by following this link and signing up for a FREE account.  http://www.communicationmatrix.org

Rowland, C. (2009). Communication Matrix. Retrieved [Oct 11, 2015] from www.communicationmatrix.org