AAC at Home- Sensory Dough (a lot of it)

We are excited to continue sharing fun activities you can do at home and the modeling cheat-sheets to go with them.

Click the picture below for a link to my Pinterest board, “All the Dough”.

Most of these doughs can be made using common ingredients you can find in your pantry. Here are a few of my favorites:

This is a tried and true recipe.

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AAC at Home- Meal Time Modeling

If you have a child at home who uses AAC, you have probably heard “model, model, model”. Sometimes this is easier said than done. It is easy to get caught up in the labeling trap, and not exploring other types of vocabulary during this naturally social time.

We have created a short cheat-sheet with some ideas of other things to talk about at lunch. Comments about what you are eating, direct the actions of others around you, ask questions about taste and texture, and let your child know how you feel about the food.

Note: “it” can be replaced with the specific food item you are eating (i.e. “apple big”).

Need a few reminders about how to model effectively?

AAC at Home- Tic-Tac-Toe

Here is a fun game for some slightly older AAC users.

There are many different ways you can play tic-tac-toe. Click on the pictures below to explore which option might work best for your child.

This PowerPoint can be accessed using a mouse, touchscreen monitor/laptop, or a tablet with the PowerPoint app.

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AAC at Home – Let’s Teach an Old Dog New Tricks

Do any of you have pets? Especially dogs! I do, and today he was whining for some of the homemade soft pretzels I made. So I started having him do some tricks to get some pretzel. But then I thought, “hmmm most of these trick commands are CORE words!” So I got on the floor, grabbed my iPad with LAMP WFL, plugged in a blue tooth speaker, and Sir Lancelot (my dog) started doing some tricks! This could be really fun to do at home with your pets! Check out the video here!

Age Appropriate Literature-Graphic Novels & Kindle

The current trend is to convert popular young adult literature into graphic novels. These can be a great resource when you are looking for age-appropriate and motivating literature for older readers. When using these in your virtual classroom or at home, Kindle Cloud and the Kindle App can be a helpful tool. Click the link below to view an Amazon list of our favorite titles.

https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/3RDRGQ3L7K4B8?ref_=wl_share

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AAC Story Time

First, I hope everyone is staying safe and healthy!  With schools closed, I’ve seen a lot of posts about AAC use at home, tele-therapy, resources for AAC users, etc.  I’m going to be doing some AAC tele-therapy and I am so excited to see my students and clients!  I am also going to be posting story time videos with AAC.  I’ll be reading books and modeling with an AAC device while reading.  My first book is one of my favorites, “If You Give a Mouse a Cookie!” I know some of my clients like to watch YouTube videos of books and video games and hope some of them will follow along for some aided language stimulation.  You can watch the video here.

I”ll mostly be modeling on LAMP WFL, Unity, and WordPower 60 since that’s what most of my clients use.  But, feel free to send me an email and I am happy to model with a different system!

Many of my students have vision impairments and benefit from hands on literacy experiences.  Although, honestly anyone can benefit from a hands on experience when learning language 🙂 So for my first story, I also made a second video for parents about story boxes.  You can watch the video here. Story boxes are interactive literacy experiences using objects or items that correlate to the story.  You can learn more about story boxes from this article on the Paths to Literacy website.

I hope this is a helpful resource for everyone at home!

Top Five Favorites: Toca Boca Apps

If you’re an SLP or teacher, I bet you have some Toca Boca apps on your iPad!  They periodically go on sale, so I’ve acquired quite a few over the years!  But there are some that just seem to work with almost any child I’m working with.  Here are my top five!

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Top Five Favorites: Alphabet Toys

Many of the individuals I work with are emergent readers.  We work a lot on letters and letter sounds.  Teachers, parents, and I often use this section from the Bridge Rating Scale with our emergent readers to see what areas of alphabet and phonological/phonemic awareness we need to work on.

Here are the top five toys that I use the most when working on alphabet knowledge and some phonological/ phonemic awareness skills.

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Inclusive Dramatic Play Activity – Baby Doll with G-tube

In the next few weeks we’re going to be reading “Sometimes” by Rebecca Elliot.  Many of the students I work with have G-tubes and are in wheelchairs.  They also, unfortunately, spend time in the hospital.  This book is a great story for children with disabilities or their siblings. The main character, Clemmie, and her sibling talk about their time in the hospital and the things Clemmie sometimes has to do.

We’re going to be reading Sometimes using the format from the Tell Me Program. To learn more about how we use the Tell Me Program click here. You can download the visuals for Sometimes here to go along with our visuals book. If you own a copy of this book and would like a copy of the electronic adapted version, send an email to AmandaSoperSLP@gmail.com.  The adapted copy contains the pictures only, no text, with background clutter removed for our students with vision impairments.  We put each page on a light box or use the PowerPoint on an iPad.

In order to address the “dramatic play” aspect of The Tell Me Program, you can make your own G-tube doll using these materials.

  1. Exacto Knife
  2. Baby Alive Doll (This brand allows you to actually feed the doll. Just make sure you buy extra diapers!)
  3. Mickey Button & Feeding Tube/Extension Set (Amanda got this one by asking the school nurse.)
  4. Syringe

To insert the Mickey Button into the baby, simply make a small hole in the appropriate spot. Slowly make the hole bigger and test the button as you go, until it is the correct size.

Put the Mickey Button in and use the syringe to insert air into the button to inflate the balloon on the inside of the baby doll. Now you can feed the baby doll using water and the syringe!